The Borzoi

Author: gibbywmu
November 18, 2008

Borzoi

Shih Tzu

Borzoi

The Borzoi is an excellent dog. This type of dog is also known as a Russian Wolfhound. Their bodies are much the same as that of a Greyhound in size and structure. These are amazing dogs for their beauty but also for their temperament. They fit within the realm of a dog that can be appreciated by anyone that is looking for one. For those with a lot of room, the Borzoi will fit right into your family unit.

As a very tall dog, the Borzoi commands attention. They have a very long but thin and narrow head shape and they have an arched muzzle. A tell tale characteristic of this dog is its tail. They are long and curved but they hang low against their backside. In addition, the coat around the neck of this dog is very thick and ruffled, giving it a unique look. When you look at the dog face on you will see that he has dark eyes that have their own unique shape of being oblong.

The unique shape of the Borzoi is only one condition that makes it unique. These dogs are very beautiful animals that fit within a family well.

You will need to walk Borzoi with proper dog leashes at least one time a day, but it is even more beneficial to provide your pet with a fenced in yard where they can run freely as that is what these dogs are well known for doing. If you live in an area with limited space, do be sure to find a location for him to run and play in.


Whippet History

Author: gibbywmu
November 18, 2008
whippet

Whippet

The Whippet dog first came to be in Northern England in the middle to late 19th century. Breeders crossed small terriers with greyhounds with the intent and hopes of getting a small but fast hound that could successfully hunt rabbits and other small game. The result was the Whippet. It was mostly the factory workers, mine workers and other working class people in England that owned the Whippet, so the became known as “poor man’s greyhound” or “poor man’s race horse”. In their spare time, the workers raced their Whippets in the fields or roads with the use of a piece of cloth as the lure and the dog had to run a straight 200-yard track.

The American Kennel Club registered its first Whippet in 1888 under the name of Jack Dempsey. In 1891, the Whippet dog was recognized by the Kennel Club of England and was then recognized as a registerable breed in England. Since then, Whippets have become one of the most popular of the breed of hound dogs at dog shows, especially because of their dog leashes walking ability. They have one many championships in different categories.


Whippet Training

Author: gibbywmu
November 18, 2008
Whippet

Whippet

Training your Whippet can be a fun and yet challenging experience. They are known for being very headstrong, but at the same time, they are eager to please their owner. Many dogs were bred years ago to do a certain thing and now that they are domestic, we expect them to become a different type of dog. Luckily for the Whippets, who were bred to race and course, we train them for the same things today. With patience and time, you can teach your Whippet obedience that will impress anyone.

It is important to remember that Whippets are very sensitive dogs and will not respond well to physical punishment or to loud, angry or stressful voices. In fact, it will be worse than no training at all. They are very capable of being taught the basic home commands such as sit, down, stay, etc. With time and patience, many dogs complete not only basic obedience but also go to compete in advanced obedience competitions. Many Whippet owners go all the way successfully with the training including lure coursing, racing, fly ball competition, dog leashes walking, and agility. Lure coursing is chasing a plastic bag pulled by a string, but often has the appearance of a fluffy animal.

If you are planning to train your Whippet for any type of competition, it is important that he or she be in top physical condition. They require exercise regularly, good nutritional food and need to be free from parasites, which can make them weak and sick. You may want to have your local vet check him over to assure he is in top condition so he can do his best. Allow your dog to train around other dogs if possible to promote a sense of competition in him or her. Training for competition can begin as early as 3 months of age. Allows show your Whippet when he has done well. Be generous with praise and treats during training.


Whippet Exercise

Author: gibbywmu
November 18, 2008
whippet

Whippet

Whippets need exercise just like any other dog. They don’t need a large yard, but should have enough room to go for a good run as they have a lot of energy to wear off on a daily basis. In addition to running, they enjoy a nice walk with their family members. It is important that their yard be fenced and when out of the yard that they always are leashed. Being part of the sighthound group, they love to chase what they consider their prey and will run for a long time and distance before getting tired. Their instinct to chase and kill their prey is so strong and they are so fast that they may get away from you before you realize it if not on dog leashes. Taking them for a walk is a good time to attempt to work on basic obedience. Many times away from the every day distractions in the home, a dog will respond better, especially a younger dog.


Whippet Temperament

Author: gibbywmu
November 18, 2008
whippets

Whippet

Whippets are very loving and affectionate dogs that enjoy being with their family members as close as possible. This sweet and docile dog is very quiet and calm in you home and very seldom barks. They will bark when they want to get a point across to you or occasionally if they are unhappy about something. It is rare that they bark when visitors come to your home. They are extremely sensitive physically and emotionally so their training should be done with positive reinforcement and not in a physical way. Because of their sensitivity, they will notice things such as stress in the home and will actually get upset to the point of making themselves sick. Some ailments that can occur are severe digestive upsets, neurotic behavior and sick to their stomach.

They are intelligent and learn very quickly, but they are very independent dogs so don’t expect perfection with them. By nature, they are standoffish with strangers, although they do bond with their family. They are such an easy going dog, that they would not make a good guard dog. It is because of their docile and passive nature that they are often placed in aging homes with the elderly. They are full of energy but love attention and affection and being in the home. While they enjoy exercise like all animals, their preference is to being inside the house with their family. When taken outside the home, always make sure to provide them with proper dog leashes for walks.


Whippets

Author: gibbywmu
November 18, 2008
whippet

Whippet

Whippets make great racing dogs due to the excellent speed, and have participated in many races such as lure coursing, straight racing and oval track racing. Whippets are such active and athletic dogs that they can easily jump on the top of the countertop, couch or wherever they want to be to see what is going on around them. If bored, they will chew on things so it is important to give them plenty of toys. Whippets were bred to chase, so it is important to always keep them on  proper dog leashes while outdoors. If they see a small animal that they consider prey, they will chase and they can run up to 35 mph. By time they get tired of the chase, they could be miles from home and lost. Many Whippets lose their lives by being hit by a car.


Afghan Hounds Behavior

Author: gibbywmu
November 18, 2008

Afghan Hound

Afghan Hound

Afghan Hound

Afghans are not incredibly social dogs by nature. They do bond well with family members but they tend to be shy and distrustful of strangers which could make traveling with them a hassle. They can also be upset very easily by changes in their environment and routine so a chaotic household is not ideal for them.
Afghan hounds are wonderful dogs but they are not for the casual dog owner. They require almost constant care and attention and their well being must be taken into account in every aspect of family life. They do seem to be one of the most high maintenance breeds of the dog world!  They are also very picky about their daily walking, so make sure to get them proper dog leashes.


Afghan Hounds Training

Author: gibbywmu
November 18, 2008

Afghan Hound

afghan Hound

Afghan Hound

Afghan hounds aren’t overly fond of being told what to do which makes training them a challenge. Housebreaking can take months to be successful and will require much patience on your part. They are very smart dogs, but they are also very independent which can be considered a negative quality by some potential dog owners.
It is often recommended that you use a crate to housebreak the Afghan hound and this will require quite a bit of space inside your home. The crate must be large enough to accommodate your pet comfortably. Remember, the little puppy that you bring home will grow quickly to become a rather large dog. When taking him for walks, always make sure that you have proper dog leashes to accomodate him.


Afghan Hounds Exercise

Author: gibbywmu
November 18, 2008
afghan

Afghan hounds are sight hounds and this means that they love to chase things. A stroll through the neighborhood after dinner is not going to be enough exercise for this dog. Also, they don’t do well in small areas and really need a large yard to romp and play in on a daily basis. They can jump very high so a fence around your yard is an absolute necessity to prevent them from chasing your neighbor’s pets.
If you live in an apartment or have do not have access to a large area for exercise an Afghan hound probably isn’t the best choice for you. These dogs are so energetic that if they aren’t given a chance to work off some of that excess energy unpleasant and even neurotic behavior can develop.  They always need proper dog leashes to help them walk as well.


Afghan Hounds Grooming

Author: gibbywmu
November 18, 2008
Afghan

There is no getting around the fact that these dogs require regular grooming in order to look their best. They will need to be brushed thoroughly at least two to three times every week. Brushing the Afghan hound isn’t a quick job as their coats are thick and can be difficult to manage. Skipping this task will result in a mess that may require a professional groomer to clean up.
Baths cannot be skipped for long periods of time and should be given a minimum of twice per month. If your dog is young and loves to play outdoors, as most Afghans do, you will probably need to give a bath more often. When you do take them outside after a bath, make sure you use proper dog leashes to walk him around the neighborhood.