Archive for the 'Dog Toys' Category


Toys For Westies

Author: admin
February 5, 2011

Westies

Westie

Westies

The Westie doesn’t care if dog toys are green, purple, read or blue. Westie wants something chewable, easily portable or make a sound like a rat. We are introducing dog toys that Westies like. There are several types of dog toys.

Kong dog toy is a trade name for a toy made of a hard rubber material, roughly shaped like a pyramid. It is a well constructed toy which lasts very well and supplies hours of fun. The shape causes the toy to bounce and roll in unpredictable directions, adding to its interest. Being strong, it can stand a lot of chewing. There is a hole in the center which can hold treats such as a bit of cheese whiz or peanut butter. Kong dog toys come in several sizes. The smallest is ideal for puppies, the mid-size for adult Westies. Some Kongs float, some come with rope attached. They are found in pet stores, at veterinarians, and some department stores. The Westie size cost ranges from $10 to $15 each. These dog toys can stand being left outside all winter, even in Saskatchewan. There are also some inferior look-alikes on the market which will not last as well.


Whippet

Author: admin
October 8, 2010

Whippet

Whippet

Whippet

Thinking about purchasing an Whippet? Then read our blog about Whippet including a brief description, information on training, dog treats, dog food, temperament, grooming, activity and history.

Whippet looks like a miniature Italian Greyhound. Whippet is a medium sized sight Italian Greyhound giving the appearance of elegance and fitness, denoting great speed, power and balance without coarseness. Whippet dogs are one of the fastest breed in the world having been timed at 36.5 mph for a 150 yard course, which is at least 10 mph faster than the fastest human can run. Whippets have frail bodies, but they are intense when racing. Whippets have small rose ears, a black nose and thin snout. Their bodies are thin and lean but muscular. Their tapering tail remains undocked. Whippets are gentle, affectionate and adaptable, splendid watch dogs. Delightful companions or great jogging partners, the Whippet needs plenty of exercise and might as well get it with you. Whippets are considered one of the friendliest of the sight hounds, but can be initially nervous or reserved around strangers. They tend to get along very well with other dogs, but smaller animals may be hunted by this breed. They get along well with children however and are very playful, though children should be gentle. The Whippet is a calm and sensitive breed that is powerful on the race track and playful at home.

Whippet loves to chase moving objects- try the following dog toys: a soft ball, flexible Frisbee (cloth), or other soft plush favorite dog toys. If you provide a dog treat when the puppy returns the thrown object to you, and offer lots of praise, you reinforce a fetch-type game. If you chase the whippet for the dog toy, that will be the game you establish. Hiding small pieces of cheese or organic dog biscuits can be fun for your Whippet puppy and child. We don’t recommend lots of food-type bones, such as pig ears, bully sticks, or cornstarch bone products for your whippet.

Whippet has a smooth, shorthaired coat so Whippet needs minimal grooming. Many will tell you their dogs don’t shed. Unless a dog has no hair, they shed and the same is true for the Whippets. You won’t find large piles of hair like you would with a longhaired dog, but Whippets shed just like any dog, specifically in the spring and fall. A good brushing with furminator once or twice a week will not only take care of that problem, but will make your Whippet very happy as well. To keep your Whippet’s coat sleek and shining, give him a good rub with a chamois cloth (which he will also love). You’ll notice the difference it makes in his appearance.

The normally placid, easygoing Whippet can be run fast if he sees an animal to chase after. Then he morphs into Super-Whippet, taking off after his prey at speeds of up to 35 miles per hour. Besides dog leashes, you need a dog harness. But when he is not chasing prey or some other lure, the Whippet is a sweet-natured, loving, and adaptable companion.

Polite with strangers, the Whippet should be accustomed to people and noises at an early age. He is peaceful with other dogs but has a high prey drive and cannot be trusted with smaller pets.

Whippet dogs are mildly stubborn, but also very sensitive. They respond favorably only to calm, upbeat training methods that emphasize dog treats and dog food.

Holistic medicine has been applied for many centuries to heal and protect humans. In recent years, Whippet owners continue to learn that natural health is equally as essential for their treasured pet as it is for them. Holistic therapy is very often referred to as alternative or natural medicine. The practice involves the use of different natural treatments such as diet and nutrition, and exercise.

For more information about Whippet, please visit http://www.whippet.com.

Whippet Resources: dog treats


September 10, 2010

Bichon Frise

Bichon Frise Puppies - Dog Toys for Bichon Frise Puppies

Bichon Frise

Dog toys are important to your Bichon Frise puppies‘ playtime, and should be kept away from his crate and out of the way of the household. Stay away from vinyl toys, as pieces tend to break off and could be swallowed. Also be careful with any dog toy that has a squeaker mechanism inside for the same reason. Rawhide bones are okay, just remember to purchase rawhide bones that is proportional to the size of your Bichon Frise puppy. Filled bones are also very popular, as well as nylon bones. If it has eyes, a nose, or strings of any kind, don’t even look at it. Any of those can break off and be swallowed. For more information about Bichon Frise, please go to Bichon Frise Club of America.

Bichon Frise might refuse to play with dog toys. I would start by just havg one dog toy that he can become attached too, very often dogs are overwhelmed with an abundance of dog toys and dog treats and is results in them not bothering with anything. Forget commercial dog treats. Use natural dog treats from his tray, such as organic dog biscuits. If you want to go with dog toys, Kong Dog Toys is a good choice for your Bichon Frise.

The dog toys made with Latex over the other vinyl and rubber toys are recommended for Bichon Frise. I think that if your Bichon Frise chews and swallows pieces of the Latex that this may be less harmful than the other materials. Also for pull toys, your Bichon Frise loves the Booda “rope” Tugs.

Dog Toy for Bichon Frise

Bichon Frise Fish Dog Toy

Bichon Frise Ethical Latex Dog Toy

Dog Treats


March 18, 2009
aussy shepherd

The Miniature Australian Shepherd is not a cross between an Australian Shepherd and another breed, it was actually developed in the late1960′s, mid 1970′s by breeding the smallest of the Australian Shepherds. This constant breeding back to the smallest of the litters produced a consistently small breed that is even being further reduced in size to the dog toy variety. Although the Australian Shepherd originated in Australia as a herding and working dog, the Miniature Australian Shepherd was bred first in the United States.

This was largely in response to the dog owners desire for a well behaved herding type dog with the coat variations found in the Miniature Australian Shepherd that would be more suited to smaller living spaces and yards in cities. In many areas the Miniature Australian Shepherd is still used as a working breed in competitions, and many people feel that the term miniature is a bit misleading as the smaller dogs are only miniature in size to the standard, and are not petite and tiny like other “miniature” breeds.

This breed also favors all sorts of dog toys.  We’ve found the kong dog toys seem to work best, as it can keep them entertained for hours.


March 18, 2009

Miniature Australian Shepherd

Miniature Australian Shepherd

Miniature Australian Shepherd

The Miniature Australian Shepherd is almost identical in appearance to the standard or full sized Australian Shepherd in everything but size. The Miniature Australian Shepherd is actually less than 18 inches tall (46 cm) at the withers when full grown, and there is also a smaller version of the breed known as a Toy Australian Shepherd which must be less than 14 inches or (36 cm) when fully grown. A still smaller variety known as the Tea Cup must be less than 12 pounds when fully grown.

The Miniature Australian Shepherd is an athletic dog that should appear solid and sturdy without appearing stocky. They have a medium length straight coat that can have a slight wave but never a curl. The coat is double with a somewhat thick and coarse outer coat covering a soft, downy inner coat. The outer coat is not coarse feeling but is rather smooth to the touch. The body is longer than the dog is tall at the shoulders, and the ribcage and chest is moderately developed. The topline is very straight from the withers to the hips. The legs are straight and the feet are slightly arched with the back legs having a well defined stifle that gives the dog its ready to jump into action appearance.

The neck is in proportion to the body and flows naturally into the powerful shoulders. The head is carried high and level when walking but often carried lower when working livestock. The muzzle is tapered and there is a well defined stop between the muzzle and the eyes. The eyes may be different colors including blue, brown, amber and flecked but are always slightly almond shaped and very clear and alert looking. The ears are carried high on the head and are full triangles with slightly rounded tips. The top one quarter to one half of the ear should fold forward and ears with no fold or ears that don’t stay erect are considered faults in show dogs.

The legs and lower body are covered with slightly longer hair known as furnishings. The Miniature Australian Shepherds are either born with a very short, stubby tail known as a natural bobtail, or the tail in docked when they are a few days old. In some countries docking is prohibited so the dogs may be seen with natural tails that are still shorter than other Collie breeds.

This particular breed of dog loves a great toy.  Kong dog toys make great toys for them, and keeps them occupied most of the day.


Cairn Terrier Training

Author: gibbywmu
March 18, 2009
cairn terrier

Cairn Terrier

Training a Cairn Terrier breed requires both consistency and creativity and the Cairn Terrier certainly requires both. Since they are somewhat independent and stubborn they need to be challenged in training as well as rewarded with lots of positives and praise. They do not do well in highly repetitive training methods and need changes in routine and limited repetitions to avoid becoming bored and non-compliant. In is important to have the Cairn understand that you are the boss and often an obedience class or puppy class is a great idea to get the basic training and commands mastered as well as integrate socialization.

The breed is very sensitive to correct and simply ignoring bad behavior and withdrawing attention for a few minutes is usually all the correction the dog will need. They are extremely quick to pick up on new tricks and commands, and often seem to understand what the owner wants them to do. They will also learn what brings them attention, and will quickly learn tricks like ringing a bell for water or bringing the leash to encourage owners to go for a walk. They are excellent candidates for both obedience and agility classes and seem to love to perform for audiences of any size. One way to help them keep entertained is by using kong dog toys.

One aspect of training that must be addressed is possessiveness. Terrier breeds, Cairns as well, will tend to snap and protect their food and toys. Teaching the dogs as puppies to relinquish food dishes, bones and toys is critical to prevent negative behaviors from forming as the dog gets older. They can also be problematic barkers to teaching them to stop barking on command is a very important part of a Cairn Terriers early training. A Cairn Terrier left to his or her own devices will find something to do to entertain themselves. They are powerful diggers and love to spend time digging in soft dirt, often to the dismay of a gardener. Cairn’s can be taught to dig in selected areas rather than all through the yard, which is a great option to prevent unexpected landscaping changes.

Socialization is also key aspect of training, especially at an early age. With proper socialization chasing and aggressive behavior can be minimized however it is often not completely eliminated. If you plan to have other pets including dogs in the house start the socialization when the Cairn is a puppy.


Cairn Terrier Exercise

Author: gibbywmu
March 18, 2009
cairn terrier

Cairn Terrier

The Cairn Terrier is a very adaptable dog to living in small spaces. The Cairn Terrier do need regular exercise if a yard is not available as they are prone to putting on weight if not provided with opportunities to run and play. Daily walks are recommended for the breed, however Cairn Terrier also love to play in the yard with family or chase a ball or stick. The Cairn Terrier is a good jogging companion provided the level of exercise is increased gradually. Due to the patellar luxation that can occur in the breed jumping is not recommended. If the Cairn Terrier is kept with other dogs he or she will self-exercise and play with the dog companions.

The Cairn Terrier love dog toys like kong dog toys. These are sure to give the Cairn Terrier plenty of excitement, and should keep him busy throughout the day. What is kong dog toys? Kong dog toys (sometimes KONG) is popular line of dog toys introduced in 1976. The classic Kong resembles a snowman-like structure of three balls pushed together. Kongs also come in several variations for dogs of different ages and sizes.

Dog toys provide dogs with physical exercise and mental stimulation. Dog toys can be made of rubber, vinyl, fabric, rope or rawhide, and are available in a wide variety of styles, including puppy toys and interactive toys for your Cairn Terrier to enjoy while you’re away. If your Cairn Terrier is well-behaved and plays well with his toys, you can positively reinforce his behavior with delicious dog treats. And don’t forget to check out dog beds for when your Cairn Terrier is tired from playing and needs some good rest!

Cairn Terrier‘s exercise should consist of free roaming in a fenced yard or daily walks. Cairn Terrier is inquisitive, so a dog leash or fenced yard is essential at all times.

Cairn Terrier

Cairn Terrier Resources:


Cairn Terrier Grooming

Author: gibbywmu
March 18, 2009
cairn terrier

Cairn Terrier

Grooming the Cairn Terrier is relatively easy and simple and does not require a professional groomer but it does need to be done on a consistent, regular basis. The Cairn Terrier should be groomed very other day with a stiff bristle brush or a pin brush, grooming both the outer hair and the softer, dense inner coat. The soft fine hair of the inner coat is prone to matting that in turn will increase the likelihood of skin problems and rashes as well as sores and infections.

In addition to regular grooming, the hair around the ears and eyes of Cairn Terrier should be regularly trimmed to avoid irritation. To safely trim the hair around the eyes always use blunt ended scissors and have someone help you by holding the dog’s head very still. Place your fingers between the scissors and the dog’s eyes to avoid any possibility of injury from a sudden movement. Keep the inside of the ears free from hair by using your fingers to pluck out any long hair. The teeth should regularly be checked for tartar build up and regular brushing with a finger sleeve or dog-toothbrush and special dog toothpaste is recommended.

At least twice a year the Cairn Terrier should have all the long and dead hairs removed from his or her coat. This is done through a process called stripping. Stripping can be done by hand by simply pulling out the long or dead hairs with the direction of hair growth. This is always back and down when you are stripping the body of the dog.

The coarse, rough outer hair of the Cairn Terrier dog contains natural oils that keep the coat waterproof and provides protection. Avoid over-bathing the breed as this will strip the natural oils from the coat. There are special shampoos and conditioners available for dogs that will protect their coats. Never use human hair products on dogs as the pH is different and can really dry and damage the dog’s hair.

After bathing, make sure to play with him, using Cairn Terrier‘s favorite toy, like kong dog toys.


Cairn Terrier Health

Author: gibbywmu
March 18, 2009
cairn terrier

Cairn Terrier

Generally the Cairn Terrier is a very healthy breed. Some of the common Health Problems that are seen are a tendency to gain weight leading to obesity and flea Allergies that result in skin rashes, excessive licking and scratching. There is also a problem in some Cairn Terriers with Cataracts that cause vision problems as the dog matures. There are also some genetic conditions including a bleeding disorder known as von Willebrands Disease and Legg Calve Perthes, a degenerative condition of the hips. Occasionally the Cairn Terrier can also suffer from patellar luxation or slipping of the kneecap that can usually be treated non-surgically.

Seeing as the Cairn Terrier is such a healthy breed, he sure does love to play and chase toys, such as kong dog toys. This is sure to keep him coming back for more day after day.


Cairn Terrier Temperament

Author: gibbywmu
March 18, 2009
cairn terrier

Cairn Terrier

For families and people that want a dog that is energetic, happy, intelligent and a very loyal pet and protector the Cairn Terrier is a perfect match. They are outgoing in their personalities and often don’t seem to realize that they are a small dog. A natural watchdog, the Cairn Terrier can be stranger, dog and pet aggressive if not properly socialized. The Cairn Terrier will often attack much large dogs in their role as protectors, so care must be taken to keep them safe and away from larger breeds that could easily cause the smaller dog injury. With proper socialization they can be excellent companion dogs for both other breeds of dogs as well as non-canine pets. A natural hunter, Cairn Terriers will chase and need to be kept within a fence or on a leash to prevent them from running off on a hunt.

Cairn Terriers are good family dogs although they can be snappish and somewhat possessive of their food and toys. In a family with children the Cairn Terrier will always be involved in the children’s games and play and loves to run and romp. Their boundless energy makes them a terrific pet for active families. Chasing balls, like kong dog toys, and playing fetch is a favorite pastime of many Cairn Terriers.

Cairn Terriers are a people breed of dog and need to have contact with their owners and family on a regular basis. They do not do well if left alone for long periods of time or kept in a kennel. Bored or lonely Cairn Terriers can quickly develop destructive or problematic habits such as constant barking or problem digging. Consistent, positive training and challenges keep this breed stimulated both mentally and physically. Cairn Terriers quickly learn new skills and tricks and love to work for praise and attention. Cairn Terriers do need affection and attention and love to find a comfortable spot on the couch or, even better yet, on a lap and spend time with the family. They make an excellent housedog and will be very active. They do love to be outside and run and play, so a yard is recommended but with regular walks it is not absolutely required. Without the right amount of exercise the Cairn Terrier can become somewhat difficult to work with and may become less compliant and more headstrong.

Despite the natural good humor and rather independent attitude of the Cairn Terrier they are a breed that does not respond well to punishment. They are surprisingly sensitive to reprimands and changes in the owner’s voice, so care needs to be taken to avoid speaking in harsh tones or raising your voice with this breed. Although not prone to being timid they can become more aloof and independent if they are mistreated, teased or not attended to in a positive fashion.