Archive for the 'Dog Hygiene' Category


Bichon Frise

Bichon Frise

Bichon Frise

A Bichon Frise is known for needing frequent dental checkups and dog teeth cleaning, due to their being susceptible to teeth and gum problems. Regular dog dental care is required to keep their teeth and gums healthy.

To keep your Bichon Frise’s teeth free from plaque and tartar, you need to provide dog treats in addition to regular tooth brushing.

Edible chew dog treats are very popular among dog owners. Zukes Dental Chew Bones and Greenies Dog Treats are two of the most well-liked edible dog treats for Bichon Frise.

Zukes are made without artificial colors, flavors or byproducts. The mini to small sizes are perfect for your Bichon Frise.

Greenies are filled with easily- digestible proteins and contain antioxidants that promote your dog’s immune system. The teenie and petite sizes are just right for your Bichon Frise.

Dog dental care is an essential part of grooming your Bichon Frise and promoting his health. By regular dog tooth brushing and providing dental dog treats, you are actually helping your Bichon Frise become healthier and happier.

Bichon Frise, also known as Bichon needs a special health care.

Dog hygiene is important since Bichon Frise can suffer early tooth loss and are prone to gum infections without regular dental care. Daily or frequent brushing and avoidance of canned foods is recommended with a regularly scheduled professional cleaning with your Bichon Frise’s vet.

Provide your Bichon Frise with a good nutritional diet. If you notice any problems with your Bichon Frise’s knees, be sure to discourage excessive climbing stairs or jumping off furniture to prevent further stress. Be sure to have your Bichon Frise checked if you see limping or favoring of one leg over another.

Bichon Frise should be combed or brushed daily or at least 2-3 times a week and all tangles should be removed before shampooing.

Regarding Bichon Frise‘s Shampoo, since Bichon is white and you want Bichon to be white, you should probably use a shampoo that has some “whitening” ingredients (which usually means the shampoo has a blue color.) But as you also probably know, some Bichons do have skin problems and you may have to use special or even medicated shampoos.

Since the Bichon Frise has that lovely curly hair it’s important to wipe your Bichon Frise’s hind (anal) area with a damp cloth after each poop to keep it clean and prevent matting.

Bichon Frise is very sensitive to fleas so be sure to keep up with preventive treatments. To discourage mites regularly trim excess hair from in between their pads on their feet and in between their ears.

Since the Bichon Frise is prone to bladder stones and infections be sure to give your pet plenty of clean, fresh water. Filtered water is desirable.

Establish a relationship between your veterinarian and your Bichon Frise. You want to find out what vaccinations and heart worm preventive medications your Bichon needs. It’s important to keep the face of your Bichon Frise clean and neatly trimmed. Eye discharge and mucus can easily accumulate in the hair in front of their eyes and lead to serious problems. Wipe away the tears in the eye area daily and consider using topical wipes or a saline solution.

Bichon Frise can live comfortably in your apartment if Bichon Frise gets enough exercise. Bichon Frise is very energetic and active so playtime can take care of most exercise needs. But Bichon Firse loves walking and running out in the open too.

With proper care your Bishon Frise can enjoy a life expectancy of 15 years or more.

Bichon frise dogs need to have their teeth cleaned daily, or every few days, to ensure that there teeth and gums remain strong and healthy. While there are different foods, treats and chew toys you can provide your pet to help prevent plaque buildup, the best care comes from a toothbrush.

Brushing your bichon frise dogs teeth is a fairly easy process that your pooch will tolerate if you familiarize him with it when he is a puppy. Therefore, when you purchase your dog grooming supplies, make sure a dog toothbrush and flavored toothpaste are among the items you obtain. Keep in mind, it is essential that you use dental paste made for dogs because human toothpastes can upset your bichon‘s stomach. Furthermore, an animal dental brush or finger brush has very soft bristles so it is gentle on their gums

If you have never brushed your bichon frise’s teeth before, here are the steps to follow to get the job done: The steps will be coming soon….

Since the Bichon Frise is graced with good health and a wonderful temperament they make an excellent choice for a pet. With plenty of love, a safe environment and proper care you can go a long way to ensure your Bichon a full, healthy and happy life.

Bichon Frise Resourses:


July 21, 2008

 

Dog Breath

Tooth and gum problems are the most common medical condition I see in pets. Because bad breath in dogs and cats go hand in hand with other health problems it is best to treat this problem even if the breath is not objectionable to you.

Why does my pet have bad breath?
The most common cause of bad breath is tartar buildup surrounding the teeth. As in people, small particles off food remain in the mouth after eating. These particles decompose creating conditions where oral bacteria thrive. These bacterial grow to form plaque which is a combination of bacteria, mineral and decomposed food. Plaque and associated oral infections give the pet’s breath an objectionable odor. Plaque also clings to the base of teeth causing the gums to become inflamed and recede. Inflamed gums leak blood serum with combines with and increase the amount of plaque. This plaque or calculus is visible as a hard yellowish coating on the outer base of the teeth.

Remarkably, pets with this condition rarely eat less. Early in the disease, the plaque is no more than a thin b rownish or yellowish coating on the sides of the teeth. It is most noticeable on the outer (lateral) surface of the larger molar teeth – the side adjacent to the cheeks and lips. In severe cases the margins where teeth and gums meet become highly inflamed and bleed when they are touched.

For reasons we do not understand, these problems are most severe in toy and smaller breeds of dogs and in purebred cats. Maltese have the highest rate of tooth and gum disease of all breeds.

This buildup of calculus causes the gum margins to recedes past the tooth enamel exposing the softer dentine material that covers the tooth roots. Dentine is much more porous and rougher than enamel and so holds infection in place. Once dentine is exposed periodic tooth care must be done more frequently and the teeth are eventually lost. This is why successful tooth care and good dental hygiene needs to begin early before these processes are advanced. Another great, non-evasive remedy, is giving the dog plenty of chewable dog treats, like lamb ears.  The constant chewing action helps to remove the tarter and plaque that builds up on the dog’s teeth.